September 2020 > Harvest Hints for Quality Silage

Harvest Hints for Quality Silage

September 16, 2020

Many moving parts need to be in place to get the best quality silage at harvest. With harvest quickly approaching, consider these four tips to help inform your silage harvest strategy.

  1. Prep Your Equipment
  2. Stay on Top of Moisture Checks
  3. Make Timely Cuts
  4. Fine-Tune Bunker Management
Keep Reading on Your Silage Harvest Strategy


Reduce Corn Silage Shrink with Good Forage Management

Now at harvest time, we have a chance to increase or at least maintain, the yield potential of our corn silage. Good forage management that includes proper packing, inoculant and sealing corn silage with bunker covers and tires is key to reducing corn silage shrink and keeping it’s quality.
 
Be sure to pay attention to all details in harvesting and storing corn silage -- doing so can help reduce shrink and preserve quality -- good milk production, starts with “high quality” forages.
Learn More
 

 

When is optimal silage harvest?

Tryston Beyrer, Agronomist with WinField United®, discusses 3 criteria that has potentially accelerated why you should check your crop stage and moisture to help ensure feed quality can be maximized for the next year.

 

 

Silage Safety

Stay safe when making silage: Take steps to eliminate or control hazards and keep everyone safe. Key dangers to be aware of:

  • Machinery

  • Fall from height

  • Avalanche or collapsing silage

Learn More


 

Precautions to prevent rollover: Rollovers account for about half of the approximately 200 tractor-related fatalities reported every year in the United States.

  • Use safety equipment like roll-over protective structures (ROPS)

  • Never fill bunker silos higher than the top of the wall

  • Install sight rails on above-ground walls

Learn More
 

 
 

Our team is here to help you get the highest-quality silage.
Contact us for recommendations.

Jim Kemink

Vice President - Agronomy Sales


 
Posted: 9/16/2020 8:44:00 AM by | with 0 comments
Filed under: Agronomy, Feed, Harvest


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